Non-Language Courses

Below is a list of all of the non-language electives that are compatible with a Chinese Studies major or minor. However, these electives aren't offered every year or every quarter, so a grid of non-language courses offered at UCSD by departments other than the Chinese Studies Program is available to help students prepare for future quarters. Most have been approved for automatic use towards a Chinese Studies major or minor. Not every course is available each quarter or every year. For the posted updated list of approved courses in any given quarter, please contact each individual department listed below or check TritonLink.

Certain courses do not have pre-approval and the student must submit a Student Petition with supporting documentation (i.e. syllabus) for approval by the Chinese Studies Program. When submitting a petition, each student should bring a minimum of a syllabus as proof of a course's content. Student are encouraged to bring a course's textbooks, homework, handouts, exams, papers and all notes taken as proof of the content of a course. Non-language courses must be 50% or more about Chinese Studies and earn a student 4 or more quarter units. Unfortunately, we are unable to accept courses whose topic cover the Asian-American experience such as those offered by the Ethnic Department at UCSD. 

Various Courses are available from the following departments: 

Anthropology

Anthropology Department

Contact this department with questions, for availability and/or authorization at (858) 534-4145 or anthroadvising@ucsd.edu

  • ANSC 136. Traditional Chinese Society (4 units)
    Course examines major institutions and culture patterns of traditional China, especially as studied through ethnographic sources. Topics include familism, religion, agriculture, social mobility, and personality. Prerequisites: upper-division standing. (Formerly known as ANRG 170.) Credit not allowed for both ANRG 170 and ANSC 136. 
  • ANSC 137 Chinese Popular Religion (4 units)
    The religious world of ordinary pre-communist times, with some reference to major Chinese religious traditions. Background in pre-modern Chinese history is recommended. Prerequisites: upper-division standing. (Formerly known as ANRG 173.) Credit not allowed for both ANRG 173 and ANSC 137. 

Communications

Communications Department

Contact Communications with questions, for availability and/or authorization at (858) 534-4410.

  • COSF 140A. Comparative Media Systems: Asia (4 units) Petition Required
    Student Petition required: Bring a syllabus to HSS 1009 for help submitting a petition

    The development of media systems in Asia: focusing on India and China. Debates over nationalism, regionalism, globalization, new technologies, identity politics, censorship, privatization and media piracy. Alignments and differences with North American and European media systems will also be considered. Prerequisites: COSF 100 or consent of instructor.

    Student Petition required: Bring a syllabus to HSS 1009 for help submitting a petition. Course must be 50% of more China based.

History

History Department

Contact the Department of History with questions, to check availability & for authorization at  (858) 534-3613 or via e-mail historyundergrad@ucsd.edu

Lower Division History Courses

  • HILD 10. East Asia: The Great Tradition (4 units)
    Compatible with only with a Chinese Studies minor. No longer required for the major.
    The evolution of East Asian civilization from the first writing through classical Hei’an Japan and late imperial Song China. Primary and secondary readings on basic ideas, institutions and practices of the Confucian, Daoist, and Buddhist paths and of the state and family. 
    This lower-division course is generally offered during Fall quarter. There is no prerequisite.
  • HILD 11. East Asia and the West, 1279–1911 (4 units)
    Compatible with only with a Chinese Studies minor. No longer required for the major.
    From the Mongol conquests to China’s last dynasty and Japan’s annexation of Korea, this course examines political, institutional, and cultural ruptures and continuities as the East Asian countries responded to the challenges of Western imperialism with defense, reform, conservative reaction and creative imitation. 
    This lower-division course is generally offered during Winter quarter. There is no prerequisite.
  • HILD 12. Twentieth-Century East Asia (4 units)
    Compatible with only with a Chinese Studies minor. No longer required for the major.
    Examines the emergence of a regionally dominant Japan before and after World War II; the process of revolution and state-building in China during the Nationalist and Communist eras; and Korea’s encounter with colonialism, nationalism, war, revolution and industrialization. 
    This lower-division course is generally offered during Spring quarter. There is no prerequisite.

Upper Division History Courses

  • HIEA 119 Religion and Popular Culture in East Asia (4 units)
    Historical, social, and cultural relationships between religion and popular culture. Secularization of culture through images, worldviews, and concepts of right and wrong that may either derive from, or pose challenges to, the major East Asian religions. Prerequisites: upper-division standing.
    The course is cross-listed as SOC/B 162R
  • HIEA 120 Classical Chinese Philosophy and Culture (4 units)
    The relation of social, political, and economic developments to the philosophical and religious traditions of China c. 1200 B.C. to 400 A.D., including Confucianism, Daoism, Legalism, correlative cosmology, and ideas about fate, spirits, and health. Previous course work on China helpful but not required. Prerequisites: upper-division standing or consent of instructor.
  • HIEA 121 Medieval Chinese Culture and Society (4)
  • HIEA 122 Late Imperial Chinese Culture and Society (4 units)
    Using primary and secondary sources, we survey the interactions of ideas and institutions in the commercial economy of China from the tenth through the eighteenth centuries, and consider their impact on the lives of individuals. Previous course work on China helpful but not required. Prerequisites: upper-division standing or consent of instructor.
  • HIEA 124/HISC 110 Science in China and the West from Ancient Times to the 17th Century (4)
  • HIEA 125 Women and Gender in East Asia (4 units) 
    The impact of modern transformations on female roles and gender relations in China, Japan, and Korea, focusing on the late imperial/early modern periods through the twentieth century. Prerequisites: upper-division standing or instructor consent.
  • HIEA 126 The Silk Road in Chinese and Japanese History (4 units)
    This course studies the peoples, cultures, religions, economics, arts, and technologies of the trade routes known collectively as the Silk Road from c. 200 BCE to 1000 CE. We will use an interdisciplinary approach. Primary sources will include written texts and visual materials. We will examine these trade routes as an early example of globalization. Prerequisites: upper-division standing or consent of instructor. 
  • HIEA 127 History of Medicine in China (4)
  • HIEA 128 History of Material Culture in China (4 units)
    Introduction to material culture in China from a historical perspective. Consider Chinese primary sources (including both historical texts and objects) from the point of view of the new interdisciplinary field of material culture studies. Prerequisites: upper-division standing.
  • HIEA 129 Faces of the Chinese Past (4 units)
    Through the biographies and autobiographies of prominent and ordinary men and women from antiquity to today, this course explores the relation of the individual to social structures, class and gender in personal experience, and the production of primary and secondary sources. Prerequisites: upper-division standing or consent of instructor.
  • HIEA 130 History of the Modern Chinese Revolution: 1800-1911 (4 units)
    From the Opium War to the 1911 Revolution. Key topics include ethnic identity under Manchu rule, the impact of Western imperialism, the Taiping and other rebellions, overseas Chinese, social change and currents of reform, and the rise of Chinese nationalism. Prerequisites: upper-division standing or consent of instructor. 
  • HIEA 131 History of the Modern Chinese Revolution: 1911-1949 (4 units)
    An exploration of the formative period of the twentieth-century Chinese Revolution: the New Culture Movement, modern urban culture, the nature of Nationalist (Guomindang) rule, war with Japan, revolutionary nationalism, and the Chinese Communist rise to power. Prerequisites: upper-division standing or instructor consent. 
  • HIEA 132 History of the People’s Republic of China (4 units)
    This course analyzes the history of the PRC from 1949 to the present. Special emphasis is placed on the problem of post-revolutionary institutionalization, the role of ideology, the tension between city and countryside, Maoism, the Great Leap Forward, the Cultural Revolution. 
  • HIEA 133 Cultural History: Twentieth Century China (4 units)
    This course looks at how the historical problems of twentieth-century China are treated in the popular and elite cultures of the Nationalist and Communist eras. Special emphasis is placed on film and fiction. Prerequisites: upper-division standing or consent of instructor.
  • HIEA 134  History of Thought and Religion in China: Confucianism (4 units)
    Course will take up one of the main traditions of Chinese thought or religion , Confucianism, and trace it from its origins to the present. The course will explain the system of thought and trace it as it changes through history and within human lives and institutions. Prerequisites: upper-division standing or instructor consent.
  • HIEA 135  History of Thought and Religion in China: Buddhism (4 units)
    Course will take up one of the main traditions of Chinese thought or religion, Buddhism, and trace it from its origins to the present. The course will explain the system of thought and trace it as it changes through history and within human lives and institutions. Prerequisites: upper-division standing or instructor consent.
  • HIEA 136  History of Thought and Religion in China: Daoism (4 units)
    Course will take up one of the main traditions of Chinese thought or religion, Daoism, and trace it from its origins to the present. The course will explain the system of thought and trace it as it changes through history and within human lives and institutions. Prerequisites: upper-division standing or instructor consent.
  • HIEA 137  Women and Family in Chinese History (4 units)
    The course explores the institutions of family and marriage, and women’s roles and experiences within the family and beyond, from classical times to the early twentieth century. Prerequisites: upper-division standing or consent of instructor.
  • HIEA 138  Women and the Chinese Revolution (4 units)
    Examines women’s roles and experiences in the twentieth-century Chinese revolution, the ways in which women participated in the process of historical change, the question of to what extent the revolution “liberated” women from “Confucian tradition.” Prerequisites: upper-division standing or consent of instructor. 
  • HIEA 140 China in the Contemporary World (4 units)
    Examines China’s attempts to manage the movements of people, ideas, and trade across its borders since 1900. How much control do individual countries such as China have over global processes? Special emphasis will be placed on global contexts and the impacts of China's decision to reintegrate its society and economy with capitalist countries since 1978. Recommended preparation: previous course work on China helpful but not required.
  • HIRE 115 Women in Chinese Religious Traditions (4)
  • HITO 102 Religious Traditions: East Asian Religious Traditions (4 units)
    Introduction to the major religious traditions of Asia: Hinduism, Buddhism, Taoism, Shinto, and Confucianism. The course will focus on one religion each year. Since special topics will vary from year to year the course may be repeated for credit three times. Prerequisites: upper-division standing.

The following courses are colloquia/seminars offered by the History Department.  Students who wish to earn a B.A. in the Chinese Studies program must take one colloquium.  A colloquium is usually an upper-division course that usually has only 15 undergraduate students enrolled. Courses numbered HIEA 161 to HIEA 171 are usually categorized as 4 unit colloquium and often foster deeper discussion on the subject matter due to the mixture of a few graduate and undergraduates. The final paper must be of substantial length (approximately 15-20 pages) that involves in depth research. Should you be interested in such a course contact the instructor via e-mail and request permission to enroll in his or her seminar. Include the following in your e-mail message: your name, student PID#, course / title of course, section ID# and reason you would like to take the course when seeking permission from a professor to add the course to your schedule (i.e. pursuing a B.A. in Chinese Studies). You should also CC historyundergrad@ucsd.edu in the e-mail message that you send to the professor. 

  • HIEA 162/262 History of Women in China (4 units)Colloquium
    This course concerns women in Chinese history in Imperial times. This course will focus on women’s changing roles in the family, society, and culture. Topics will vary from year to year. Requirements will vary for undergraduate, MA, and PhD students. Prerequisites: upper-division standing.
  • HIEA 163/263. Cinema and Society in Twentieth-Century China (4) You must petition this course at HSS 1009 as a colloquium.

    This colloquium will explore the relationship between cinema and society in twentieth-century China. The emphasis will be on the social, political, and cultural impact of filmmaking. The specific period under examination (1930s, 1940s, post-1949) may vary each quarter. Graduate students will be expected to submit an additional paper. Prerequisites: upper-division or graduate standing and department stamp.

  • HIEA 164/264 Seminar in Late Imperial Chinese History (4 units) Colloquium
    Pairs primary sources with scholarship built on them to illuminate later imperial state, society, and individual lives, and to show how historians generate and answer questions. Topics vary; may be repeated for credit. Graduate students will be expected to submit an additional paper or project. Prerequisites: upper-division or graduate standing and department stamp.
  • HIEA 165/265 History of Material Culture in China (4 units) | Colloquium
    Topics will vary in the history of medieval China. Requirements will vary for undergraduate, MA, and PhD students. Graduate students will submit a more substantial piece of work with in-depth analysis and with an increased number of sources cited. A typical undergraduate paper would be ten pages, whereas a typical graduate paper would require engagement with primary sources, more extensive reading of secondary material, and be about twenty pages. Prerequisites: upper-division or graduate standing and department stamp. +
  • HIEA 167/267 Special Topics in Modern Chinese History (4 units)Colloquium
    This seminar examines various domestic and international issues in Chinese history from 1800 to recent times. When topics vary, may be repeated for credit. Graduate students will be required to submit a more substantial piece of work or an additional paper. Prerequisites: upper-division or graduate standing and department stamp.
  • HIEA 168/268 Special Topics in Classical and Medieval Chinese History (4 units) Colloquium
    Chinese society, thought, religion, culture, economy and politics from the Shang through the Song dynasties, through primary and secondary sources. Topics vary; may be repeated for credit. Requirements differ for undergraduate, MA and PhD students. Graduate students will be required to submit a more substantial piece of work or an additional paper. Prerequisites: upper-division standing or consent of instructor and department stamp.
  • HIEA 170/270 Colloquium on Science, Technology, and Medicine in China (4)  | Colloquium
  • HIEA 171/271 Society and Culture in Pre-modern China (4 units) Colloquium
    Explores pre-modern Chinese society and culture through the reading and discussion of classics and masterpieces in history. Examines how values and ideas were represented in the texts and how they differed, developed, or shifted over time. Requirements will vary for undergraduate, MA, and PhD students. Graduate students are required to submit an additional paper. Prerequisites: upper-division or graduate standing, department stamp. 

Graduate School of Global Policy and Strategy (GPS)

Graduate School of Global Policy and Strategy

Contact this GPS with questions to check availability at (858) 534-7647 or via their website.

Note: Undergraduate students who qualify who wish to take a graduate level course may do so, follow the instructions and requirements below:

  1. Undergraduate students will need to take an add card to the professor
  2. Confirm approval before meeting with Jerry or Laura at GPS Advising.
  3. Prior knowledge of the topic
  4. Minimum 3.0 GPA is required.
  5. Undergraduates cannot take more than 4 courses during a quarter when enrolled in an IRGN.
  • IRGN 400 International Relations of Asia-Pacific (4 units)
    International relations and developing international political economies of nations bordering the Pacific. Topics include: the “Pacific Basin” concept; the U.S. and “hegemonic-stability” theory; legacies of the Korean War and Sino-Soviet dispute; immigration patterns and their consequences; and Japan’s foreign policy. Course must be 50% or more about China.
  • IRGN 403 The Rise of China: Security and Technology (4 units)
    This course examines China's aspirations and historical efforts to become a world-class technological and military power. Of particular interest are the technological foundations of China's security relating to its military power and long-term economic and strategic competitiveness and sources of its technological innovation. Non-GPS graduate students may enroll with consent of instructor. Students may not receive credit for both IRGN 433 and IRGN 290 or 490 Special Topics course with the same course title.
  • IRGN 404 Chinese Politics (4 units)
    This course will analyze post-1949 Chinese politics, including political institutions, the policy making process, and citizen political behavior. Special attention will be given to the prospects for political reform in China. 
  • IRGN 405 U.S.-China Relations (4 units)
    Can the United States and China manage to develop a constructive relationship or are they headed toward a hostile relationship? This course addresses this question by examining the domestic and international influences on the foreign policies of both countries and key issues in the bilateral relationship. Students also do policy projects.
  • IRGN 461 Doing Business in China (4 units)
    This course describes the Chinese commercial, organizational, and cultural environment. Case studies of foreign businesses in China are examined, and the opportunities and pitfalls of operation in China are considered. Negotiation with Chinese counterparts is covered through a negotiation exercise. The focus is on mainland China, but some attention is given to business in Hong Kong and Taiwan as well. Students are required to prepare business plans for proposed Chinese ventures. 
  • IRGN 467 Chinese Environmental and Enery Policy (4 units)
    This course will focus on three dimensions of Chinese environmental and energy policy. First, we will introduce the causes and consequences of environmental and energy problems. Second, we will examine Chinese environmental and energy governance: institutions, laws, and regulations for environmental protection, energy production and consumption. Third, we will explore the practices of the Chinese government to address the emerging environmental and energy options, focusing on climate change. Non-GPS students may enroll with consent of instructor.
  • IRGN 486 Economic and Social Development of China (4 units)
    This course examines China’s development experience from a generally economic standpoint. Contents include: patterns of traditional Chinese society and economy; geography and resource constraints, impact of the West and Japan; development since 1949 and contemporary problems and options. 

Literature

Literature Department

Contact the Department of Literature with questions, to check availability & for authorization at (858) 534-3210 or via e-mail at litinfo@ucsd.edu

  • LTWL 4C Fiction and Film in Twentieth-Century Societies (4 units)
    A study of modern culture and of the way it is expressed and understood in novels, stories, and films. The sequence aims at an understanding of relationship between the narrative arts and society in the twentieth century.  
  • LTCH 101 Readings in Contemporary Chinese Literature (4 units)
    Readings are in English though student's operant knowledge of Mandarin Chinese is essential.
    Intended for students who have the competence to read contemporary Chinese texts, poetry, short stories, and criticism in vernacular Chinese. May be repeated for credit as topics vary up to 3 times. 
  • LTEA 100A Classical Chinese Poetry in Translation (4 units)
    A survey of different genres of traditional Chinese poetry from various periods. 
  • LTEA 100B Modern Chinese Poetry in Translation (4 units)
    A survey of Chinese poetry written in the vernacular from 1918 to 1949. 
  • LTEA 100C Contemporary Chinese Poetry in Translation (4 units)
    A survey of Chinese poetic development from 1949 to the present. 
  • LTEA 110A Classical Chinese Fiction in Translation (4 units)
    The course will focus on a few representative masterpieces of Chinese literature in its classical age, with emphasis on the formal conventions and the social or intellectual presuppositions that are indispensable to their understanding. May be repeated for credit when topics vary. 
  • LTEA 110B Modern Chinese Fiction in Translation (4 units)
    A survey of representative works of the modern period from 1919 to 1949. May be repeated for credit when topics vary. 
  • LTEA 110C Contemporary Chinese Fiction in Translation (4 units)
    An introductory survey of representative texts produced after 1949, with particular emphasis on the social, cultural, and political changes. May be repeated for credit when topics vary. 
  • LTEA 120A Chinese Films (4 units)
    A survey of representative films from different periods of Chinese cinematic development. Priority may be given to Chinese Studies majors and Literature majors. Repeatable for credit when topics vary. 
  • LTEA 120B Taiwan Films (4 units)
    A survey of “New Taiwan Cinema” of the Eighties and Nineties. Priority may be given to Chinese Studies majors and Literature majors. Repeatable for credit when topics vary. 
  • LTEA 120C Hong Kong Films (4 units)
    An examination of representative works of different film genres from Hong Kong. Priority may be given to Chinese Studies majors and Literature majors. Repeatable for credit when topics vary. 
  • LTEA 120D Filming Chinese Literature (4)
  • LTWL 113 Intercultural Writing: Chinese (4)
  • LTWL 176 Literature and Ideas: Taoism (4 units)
    topic must be on China to recieve Chinese Studies credit. 
    The course will center on writers or movements of international literary, cultural, or ideological significance. The texts studied, if foreign, may be read either in the original language or in English. May be repeated for credit as topics vary. 
  • LTEN 159B Chinese Poetry and American Imagination (4).
  • LTCO 274 Genre Studies - Intercultural Poetics (4 units)
    A consideration of a representative selection of works relating to a theme, form, or literary genre. May be repeated for credit as topics vary. 
  • LTCS 170 Visual Cultures: Chinese Visual Cultures (4 units)
    Student Petition required: Bring a syllabus to HSS 3084 for help submitting a petition
    The course will focus on visual practices and discourses in their intersection and overlap, from traditional media, print, and photography to film, video, TV, computers, medical scanners, and the Internet. 
Note: In order for courses to satisfy the Chinese Studies requirement, all courses must be related to China. 

Music

Music Department

Contact the Department of Music with questions, to check availability & for authorization at mus-ug@ucsd.edu

  • MUS 13AS World Music/Asia and Oceania (4 units)
    This course is only compatible with the Chinese Studies minor and NOT applicable for Chinese Studies Major.  

    Introduction to selected performance traditions of Asia and Oceania with links to local and visiting musicians from these cultures. No prior technical knowledge of music is necessary. Prerequisites: none. 
  • MUS 107 Critical Studies Seminar: Nature & the Environment in Chinese Music (4 units)
    The topic changes on this course. It may be taken more than once as long as the topic is China based and a student enrolls in different topics related to China.  
    This seminar explores the history of music in relation to critical issues, such as race, gender, sexuality, the environment, and politics. Readings include recent literature in cultural studies, musicology, and sociology. Topics vary. May be taken three times for credit. Prerequisites: Music 120C. 
  • MUS 111 Topics/World Music Traditions (4 units)
    The topic changes on this course. It may be taken more than once as long as the topic is China based and a student enrolls in different topics such as Beijing Opera & Taiwan Music.
    A study of particular regional music in their repertory, cultural context, and interaction with other traditions. Topics vary. Prerequisites: none. 
Note: In order for courses to satisfy the Chinese Studies requirement, courses must be 50% or more related to China, Taiwan, Hong Kong, etc. 

Political Science

Political Science Department

Contact the Department of Music with questions, to check availability & for authorization at (858) 534-3548 or via e-mail at askpolisci@ucsd.edu
 

  • POLI 113A East Asian Thought in Comparative Perspective (4 units)
    Student Petition required: Bring a syllabus to HSS 1009 for help submitting a petition
    This course examines the major traditions of East Asian thought in comparative perspective. Topics include Confucianism, Taoism, Buddhism, and contemporary nationalist and East Asian political thought. Throughout, focused comparisons and contrasts will be made between western and eastern thought. Prerequisites: upper-division standing.
  • POLI 113B Chinese & Japanese Political Thought I (4 units)
    Examines philosophical traditions of ancient and modern China and Japan, to understand how these have been reflected in Chinese and Japanese development. Course will be in English; however, students with Chinese or Japanese language skills will have opportunity to use these. Graduate students will be required to complete a seminar-length research paper; undergraduate students will write a paper. Prerequisites: upper-division standing for 113B. 
  • POLI 113C Chinese & Japanese Political Thought II (4)
    A continuation of 113B which follows political philosophical themes in China and Japan through the twentieth century. Important topics will include Buddhism and Confucianism as they changed in each context in response to internal and external stimuli. Prerequisite: POLI 113B.  
  • POLI 130B Politics in the Peoples' Republic of China (4)
    This course analyzes the political system of China since 1949, including political institutions, the policy-making process, and the relationship between politics and economics. The main focus is on the post-Mao era of reform beginning in 1978.
  • POLI 131C The Chinese Revolution (4 units)
    An analysis of the dynamics of the Chinese Revolution from the fall of the Qing Dynasty (1644–1911) to the present. Emphasis is placed on the relationship between political thought and the dynamics of the revolutionary process. 
  • POLI 132 Political Development and Modern China (4 units) 
    Political development has dominated the study of comparative politics among US academicians since the revival of the Cold War in 1947. This course examines critically this paradigm and its Western philosophical roots in the context of the experience of modern China. 

Sociology

Sociology Department

Contact the Department of Sociology with questions, to check availability & for authorization at (858) 534-4627

  • SOCI 162R Religion and Popular Culture in East Asia (4 units) | Formerly SOC/B 162R.
    (Same as HIEA 119.) Historical, social, and cultural relationships between religion and popular culture. Secularization of culture through images, worldviews, and concepts of right and wrong, which may either derive from or pose challenges to the major East Asian religions. Prerequisites: upper-division standing. Will not receive credit for SOCI 162R and SOCB 162R.
  • SOCI 188G Chinese Society (4 units) Formerly SOC/D 188B.
    The social structure of the People’s Republic of China since 1949, including a consideration of social organization at various levels: the economy, the policy, the community, and kinship institutions. Prerequisites: upper-division standing. Will not receive credit for SOCI 188G and SOCD 188B.
  • SOCI 189. Special Topics in Comparative-Historical Sociology (4) | Formerly SOC/D 189.
    topic must be on China to recieve Chinese Studies credit. 

    Readings and discussion in selected areas of comparative and historical macrosociology. Topics may include the analysis of a particular research problem, the study of a specific society or of cross-national institutions, and the review of different theoretical perspectives. Contents will vary from year to year. Prerequisites: upper-division standing.

Third World Studies

Third World Studies Program

Contact the Third World Studies Program with questions & to check availability at (858) 822-0377

  • TWS 23 Third World Literatures: Chinese Literature (4 units)
    An introduction to the cultures of various Third World countries through close reading of selected literary texts.  TWS 23 examines Chinese literature.  Topics will vary each quarter. There are no prerequisites for this lower-division course.

       Note: TWS 23 is only compatible with a minor in Chinese Studies.

Visual Arts

Visual Arts Department

Contact the Department of Visual Arts with questions and to check availability via Virtual Advising Center. This department requires a waiting period for authorization to enroll for anyone other than VIS majors & minors.  When contacting the VIS department by e-mail at Vis-ug@ucsd.edu be sure to include your name, PID, the section ID# & course you are interested in. Inform VIS that you are a Chinese Studies major or minor.

  • VIS 105D. The Aesthetics of Chinese Calligraphy (4)
    This course examines Chinese calligraphy as an art form. This conceptually based introductory course combines fundamental studio exercises with creative explorations. Students are exposed to traditional and contemporary forms of Chinese calligraphy while encouraged to experiment with basic aesthetic grammars. Prerequisites: VIS 105A. 
    Chinese Studies Minor/Major students may take the course without prior VIS 105A credit but must request permission from the Visual Arts Department. 
    Students may request permission via instructions below. 

    Instructions for requesting permission to take VIS 105D   

    1. Go to Virtual Advising Center (VAC: http://vac.ucsd.edu)
    2. Use the "Ask a Question" tab & direct the question towards the Visual Arts Department
    3. Write "Chinese Studies major/minor requesting permission to enroll in VIS 105D, and include the Section ID number"
    4. Wait for a reply on VAC that you've been approved to take VIS 105D. 
    5. After you've been approved, register for VIS 105D on WebReg during your assigned enrollment time. 
  • VIS 105E. Chinese Calligraphy as Installation (4)
    VIS 105D MUST be taken prior to taking 105E, there are NO exceptions to this prerequisite.  
    This course concerns East–West aesthetic interactions. What are the conceptual possibilities when calligraphy, an ancient form of Chinese art, is combined with installation, a contemporary artistic Western practice? Emphasis is placed on such issues as cultural hybridity, globalization, multiculturalism, and commercialization. Prerequisites: VIS 105D. 

       Instructions for requesting permission to take VIS 105E   

    1. Go to Virtual Advising Center (VAC: http://vac.ucsd.edu)
    2. Use the "Ask a Question" tab & direct the question towards the Visual Arts Department
    3. Write "Chinese Studies major/minor requesting permission to enroll in VIS 105E, and include the Section ID number"
    4. Wait for a reply on VAC that you've been approved to take VIS 105E. 
    5. After you've been approved, register for VIS 105E on WebReg during your assigned enrollment time. 
  • VIS 114GS Art and Visual Culture in China (4 units)
    Student Petition required: Bring a syllabus to HSS 1009 for help submitting a petition

    This course studies important developments in the arts of China in the context of contemporary cultural phenomena. The factors behind the making of art will be brought to bear on selected objects or monuments from China's great artistic eras.  Prerequisites: upper-division standing or consent of instructor and departmental approval.
  • VIS 127B Arts of China (4 units)
    Course will survey major trends in the arts of China from a thematic point of view, explore factors behind the making of works of art, including political and religious meanings, and examine contexts for art in contemporary cultural phenomena. Prerequisites: upper-division standing. VIS 21B recommended.
  • VIS 127C Arts of Modern China (4 units)
    Course will explore Chinese art of the twentieth century. By examining artworks in different media, we will investigate the most compelling of the multiple realities that Chinese artists have constructed for themselves. Prerequisites: upper-division standing. VIS 21B recommended.
  • VIS 127D Early Chinese Paintings (4 units)
    Explore representations of figures and landscapes from the dawn of Chinese painting through the Yuan dynasty, with stress on developments in style and subject matter and relationships to contemporary issues in philosophy, religion, government, society, and culture. Prerequisites: upper-division standing. VIS 21B recommended.
  • VIS 127E Later Chinese Paintings (4 units)
    Explores major schools and artists of the Ming and Qing periods, including issues surrounding court patronage of professional painters, revitalization of art through reviving ancient styles, commercialization’s challenges to scholar-amateur art, and the influences of the West. Prerequisites: upper-division standing. VIS 21B recommended.
  • VIS 127G 20th Century Chinese Art (4 units)
    Through examining artworks in different media, theoretical writings and documentary data, will explore the ways in which Chinese artists of the twentieth century have defined modernity and their own tradition against the complex background of China’s history. Prerequisites: upper-division standing. VIS 21B recommended.
  • VIS 127GS Issues in modern and Contemporary Chinese Art (4 units)
    Student Petition required: Bring a syllabus to HSS 1009 for help submitting a petition.
    This course investigates the multiple realities of art and visual culture in twentieth-century China, and explores the ways in which Chinese artists have defined modernity and their tradition against the complex background of China’s history. Prerequisites: upper-division standing or consent of instructor and departmental approval.
  • VIS 127N Art and Modernity in China and Japan (4 units)
    Surveys the key works and developments in the modern art and visual culture of Japan from Edo and Meiji to the present and of China from the early twentieth century to contemporary video, performance, and installation art. Prerequisites: upper-division standing. VIS 21B recommended.
  • VIS 128DN Asian Art History (staff) (4 units)